Plants for Bees

Plants for Bees

 

asunflowerMany plants offer bees nectar and pollen. Pollen is especially valuable as a food source early in the year.

Solitary, Bumble and Honey bees are attracted to these plants. Please scroll right down to the page bottom for useful additional notes.

TREES
Amelanchier [Snowy Mespilus]
Norway Maple [Acer platanoides]
Birch [Betula] pollen
Beech [Fagus] pollen
Sweet Gum [Liquidambar]
Tulip Tree [Liriodendron]
Crab Apples [Malus]
Winter Flowering Cherry [Prunus subhirtella and varieties]
Oaks [Quercus] pollen
Whitebeams [Sorbus aria]

aborageSHRUBS
Strawberry Trees [Arbutus]
Judas Tree [Cercis]
Flowering Quince [Chaenomeles]
Berberis ~ many varieties and species
Butterfly Bush [Buddleja]
Box [buxus]
Californian Lilac [Ceanothus]
Sun Rose [Cistus]
Dogwoods [Cornus]
Cotoneaster
Broom [Cytisus]
Daphne
Elaeagnus
Escallonia
Fuchsia
Holly [Ilex]
Bay Laurel [Laurus nobilis]
Lavender
Olearia
Russian Sage [Perovskia]
Nine Bark [Physocarpus]
Potentilla
Cherry Laurel [Prunus laurocerasus]
Firethorn [Pyracantha]
Sumach [Rhus typhina]
Elder [Sambucus nigra and varieties]
Senecio greyii/Sunshine
Skimmia
Lilac [Syringa]
Laurustinus [Viburnum tinus]
Weigela

PERENNIALS
Bugle [Ajuga]
Michaelmas Daisies [Aster]
Astrantia
Foxgloves [Digitalis]
Penstemons
Sage [Salvia]
Ice Plants [Sedum]
Mullein [Verbascum]

NOTES
– Plants in sheltered and sunny spots are most likely to be used.
– Try to choose plants that give a succession of flowers throughout as many months of the year as possible.
– Avoid using pesticides and if you do have to use them, choose those based on natural occurring materials such as Derris. Treat ‘hot spots’ of pest infestation, treat early before the infestation takes hold and spray late in the evening when bees have returned to their hives or nests.

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